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News Flash: You’re Probably Eating Too Much Protein

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Our entire lives, we’ve been taught that every meal has to contain protein to be nutritious. And if you’re feeling hungry, protein is the magic key to filling you up fast. And that the biggest challenge of eating a vegetarian or vegan diet is that it’s tough to make sure you’re getting adequate protein. Well, it might officially be time to stop pushing the issue.

Most American women eat about twice the protein they actually need in a day, says health writer Sophie Egan in the New York Times. The recommended daily intake? 46 grams. The average U.S. woman, on the other hand, easily eats 100 grams of protein in a 24-hour period. Even most vegetarian and vegan women are in the ballpark of 60 to 80 grams of protein a day.

We can thank protein-packed snacks, energy bars and larger portions at restaurants for helping us become protein overachievers. The occasional overdose is no big deal, but if you’re mixing protein powder into your peanut butter and washing it down with a protein shake, keep…

Sugar not so sweet for mental health

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Sugar may be bad not only for your teeth and your waistline, but also your mental health, claimed a study Thursday that was met with skepticism by other experts.

Researchers at University College London (UCL) compared the reported sugar intake of more than 8,000 people in a long-term British study, to their mood.

The study participants, civil servants, were monitored from 1985-1988, and filled out a questionnaire every few years thereafter.

Researchers examined data from that study for an association between sugar intake and "common mental disorders" (CMD) such as anxiety and depression.

The UCL team found "an increased likelihood" for men with a higher intake of sweet foods and drinks to develop CMD after five years, and a general "adverse effect" on mental health for both sexes.

And they concluded, in a study published in the journal Scientific Reports, that "lower intake of sugar may be associated with better psychological health."

But dietician Ca…

You're Probably Forgetting To Brush This Part Of Your Teeth

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Despite most of us thinking that we’re brushing our teeth correctly or flossing frequently enough, dentist visits are often full of surprises. Irritation, cavities, gingivitis ― the list of our maladies goes on and on.

It’s always important to go back to basics and make sure that you’re brushing your teeth with proper technique. When it comes to ways people are brushing their teeth incorrectly, Jessica Hilburg, DDS and associate dean for clinical affairs at the NYC College of Dentistry, is the expert.

She told HuffPost that there’s one important part of your mouth that too many people skip over.
“Sometimes people forget to brush the insides of their teeth, the surfaces that face the tongue and the palate,” Hilburg told HuffPost. ”Sometimes people forget these areas because we don’t see them when we look in the mirror. Food and plaque can buildup in these areas so it’s just as important to brush there as it is on the front of our teeth where we can easily see.”
Hilburg also said not brushi…

Where a woman gains weight can increase the risk of heart disease

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It's not only how much weight you put on, but where you gain the flab that can affect your risk of heart disease, a new study suggests.

Researchers have found that women who store excess pounds around their midsections are more likely to also accumulate fat around their hearts, a risk factor for heart disease. This was especially true for black women, according the study which was published in Menopause.

"Studies have shown that it's not just being overweight that matters, it's also where you store the fat," said study coauthor Samar R. El Khoudary, Ph.D, associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh. "When the fat is near the heart it can be like a metabolically active organ that can secrete toxic chemicals. And because there is no border between the fat and the heart, it's much easier for those toxic chemicals to pass into the heart."

While the study focused on women who were near, at, or post menopause, the results would most l…

Can you take medications past their expiration date?

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Recent research raises questions about how long over-the-counter and prescription drugs really last

The expiration dates on over-the-counter and prescription medications seem pretty black and white, but there's some question about whether drugs last even longer.

Expiration dates typically range from 12 to 60 months after production. But manufacturers aren't required to determine how long they'll remain potent after that, enabling them to set their own expiration dates and possibly shortchange consumers.

Testing reported in JAMA Internal Medicine showed that eight medications with 15 different active ingredients were still potent decades beyond their expiration dates.

The U.S. government's own Shelf Life Extension Program extends the dates on some drugs in federal stockpiles to save the military from the cost of replacing them. Its own study found that 90 percent of more than 100 drugs were perfectly good even 15 years after expiration.

But what about the meds in your home?

A…

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Do you really need these vitamin supplements?

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According to 2016 consumer survey data, 71 percent of U.S. adults take some type of dietary supplement. And the appeal of supplements is obvious. We know vitamins are necessary for health, so why not make sure we’re covering our bases?
The darker side of dietary supplements is that many of the alleged health benefits are coming straight from people who stand to make big money from vitamin sales, and the research doesn’t always agree with the claims of vitamin manufacturers and retailers. Here’s a look at four vitamins you may want to think twice about.


supplements?



Published July 22, 2017
Fox News











We know vitamins are necessary for health, so why not make sure we’re covering our bases?  (iStock)





According to 2016 consumer survey data, 71 percent of U.S. adults take some type of dietary supplement. And the appeal of supplements is obvious. We know vitamins are necessary for health, so why not make sure we’re covering our bases?
The darker side of dietary supplements is that many of the allege…